Book Review: Wasteland

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4 out of 5 stars rating

Wasteland by Terry Tyler, book two in the Operation Galton Series, is amazingly realistic and as you read you get drawn into this futuristic world even though it is decades away. 

Although this is the second book in this series it seemed adequate as a  read-alone book. Characters are fully developed from the beginning of the story so you can relate to them entirely through the plotline.

I am not usually a reader of dystopian futuristic work but Terry Tyler has changed my mind altogether. This story is read in a present tense in the year 2061, in the UK. Tyler has pulled into this book a storyline of residents who now live either in functioning Megacities or as outcasts in lost, barren, and dilapidated Wastelands. In the Megacities citizens are monitored completely and are kept happy and healthy. If rules are not followed, residents may be sent to the Hope Villages as a result, an awful result, but not as bad as the Wastelands. Rae is a girl who seems to have a well structured life within the Megacity and goes throughout her day without incident, contrary to her boyfriend Nash who takes life less seriously. Rae finds out that she was born into a real family and decides to disobey the law and try to find her family. 

What caught my interest the most and kept me wanting to read more was the realistic connections Tyler made between current day ideas and how a government may shape a new world to iron out all of the problems our world is presented with in the 2020’s. It is like a modern day version of 1984, which is actually mentioned in the story. Although all of the ideas are not made to be significant in the story they are mentioned throughout. For example, when it is pointed out if a certain young man could be Rae’s brother she says there is no way because she is white and he is black. This however would not be acceptable in the Megacity because it would be considered racist to bring up any such topic. Also touched upon is the changes the LGBTQ society has gone through since our current day social opinions. 

I give this story four out of five stars for its believability, readability and overall well structured story line. It is the type of story that you might want to go back and reread just to see if you may have missed something in the earlier pages as so many important topics arise throughout.

Wasteland by Terry Tyler, book two in the Operation Galton Series, is amazingly realistic and as you read you get drawn into this futuristic world even though it is decades away. 

Although this is the second book in this series it seemed adequate as a  read-alone book. Characters are fully developed from the beginning of the story so you can relate to them entirely through the plotline.

I am not usually a reader of dystopian futuristic work but Terry Tyler has changed my mind altogether. This story is read in a present tense in the year 2061, in the UK. Tyler has pulled into this book a storyline of residents who now live either in functioning Megacities or as outcasts in lost, barren, and dilapidated Wastelands. In the Megacities citizens are monitored completely and are kept happy and healthy. If rules are not followed, residents may be sent to the Hope Villages as a result, an awful result, but not as bad as the Wastelands. Rae is a girl who seems to have a well structured life within the Megacity and goes throughout her day without incident, contrary to her boyfriend Nash who takes life less seriously. Rae finds out that she was born into a real family and decides to disobey the law and try to find her family. 

What caught my interest the most and kept me wanting to read more was the realistic connections Tyler made between current day ideas and how a government may shape a new world to iron out all of the problems our world is presented with in the 2020’s. It is like a modern day version of 1984, which is actually mentioned in the story. Although all of the ideas are not made to be significant in the story they are mentioned throughout. For example, when it is pointed out if a certain young man could be Rae’s brother she says there is no way because she is white and he is black. This however would not be acceptable in the Megacity because it would be considered racist to bring up any such topic. Also touched upon is the changes the LGBTQ society has gone through since our current day social opinions. 

I give this story four out of five stars for its believability, readability and overall well structured story line. It is the type of story that you might want to go back and reread just to see if you may have missed something in the earlier pages as so many important topics arise throughout. The only reason I did not give it five stars is I felt that some of the chapters were a little too long, making it feel like some situations became overemphasized. Overall, I would definitely recommend this book!

2 thoughts on “Book Review: Wasteland

    1. I loved a few things, especially when you mention about how the transgender/lgbtq is addressed in the future also when you make reference to things that are going on right now as their “past”. I just think that there are some big issues in society now that you really have to wonder how they will pan out in the end.

      Like

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